Fukushima Radiation Poisoning Food In The Sea (And Land)

Bloomberg reports that Record-High Levels of Radiation Found in Sea Near Crippled Nuclear Reactor.

(emphasis mine) [my comment]

Record-High Levels of Radiation Found in Sea Near Crippled Nuclear Reactor
By Go Onomitsu and Sachiko Sakamaki - Mar 30, 2011 12:06 AM MT Wed Mar 30 07:06:33 GMT 2011

Record-high readings of contaminated sea water were found yesterday near the crippled Dai-Ichi nuclear plant, Japan's nuclear safety agency said, while workers grappled with ways to reduce toxic radiation at the site of the world's worst nuclear disaster in 25 years.

Radioactive iodine in seawater rose to 3,355 times the regulated safety limit yesterday afternoon from 2,572 times earlier in the day, agency spokesman Hidehiko Nishiyama said. No fishing is occurring nearby so there is no threat, he said.

The New York Times reports that Marine Life Faces Threat From Runoff.

Marine Life Faces Threat From Runoff
March 28, 2011
By ELISABETH ROSENTHAL and WILLIAM J. BROAD

The announcement by Japan' s Agency for Natural Resources and Energy that
high levels of radioactive cesium have been detected in seawater near the crippled nuclear reactors raises the prospect that radiation could enter the food chain.

Cesium 137 levels were 20 times the normal level about 1,000 feet from the effluent at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. That is far less than the level of the other main radioactive isotope spilling from the plant, iodine 131. It was found in concentrations of more than 1,150 times the maximum allowable for a seawater sample a mile north of the plant.

Still, scientists say,
cesium 137 poses the greater long-term danger to the marine food chain.

Iodine 131 degrades relatively fast, becoming half as potent every eight days. So the radioactive risk can be combated by banning fishing and the consumption of seafood for a period of time, as the Japanese have already done.

Cesium 137, on the other hand, has a half-life of 30 years. Worse still, it is absorbed by marine plants, which are eaten by fish and — like mercury — tends to become concentrated as it moves up the food chain.

“It' s worrisome in that CS 137 is leaking, although the levels are still low,” said Paul G. Falkowski, a professor at Rutgers University' s Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences. “At some point this water that is pooling in various places is ultimately going to make its way out to the sea.” And if there is a lot of cesium 137 over an extended period “then you' ll have to worry.”

The exact source of the cesium 137 is unclear, although some scientists have speculated that
the seawater dumped on the overheating reactors to cool them picked up radiation and then washed back out to sea. But Japanese officials said highly radioactive water in several tunnels is threatening to overflow and may also contain cesium 137.

Sushi Exports From Japan Canceled

Bloomberg reports that Sushi Exports From Japan Canceled on Concern Over Radiation Contamination.

Sushi Exports From Japan Canceled on Concern Over Radiation Contamination
By Aya Takada - Mar 29, 2011 9:03 PM MT Wed Mar 30 04:03:20 GMT 2011

Sushi Purchases From Japan Canceled Amid Radiation Concerns
A fishmonger slices up a bluefin tuna at Tokyo's Tsukiji fish market on March 28. Photographer: Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images

Exports of Japanese seafood have been canceled by foreign buyers on concern that the products may have been contaminated by radiation leaking from the crippled Fukushima nuclear plant, a government official said.

At least 10 orders have been withdrawn since the March 11 earthquake and tsunami damaged the power station, Hiromi Isa, trade office director at Japan' s Fisheries Agency, said in an interview in Tokyo yesterday. The cancellations were made even as the government assured the food' s safety, Isa said.

Sushi restaurants and hotels, including Shangri-La Asia' s luxury chain, dropped Japanese seafood from their menus because of radiation fears. Global fishing companies such as Hong Kong' s Pacific Andes International Holdings Ltd. (1174) could benefit from increased demand to replace Japanese produce. Japan exported 565,295 metric tons of fish and other marine products worth 195 billion yen ($2.41 billion) last year.

“We' ve heard from Japanese exporting companies that fish purchases have been canceled and buyers have been asking for discounts,” Isa said. He declined to identify companies and countries involved, or the size of the withdrawn orders.

Radioactive iodine in seawater near the stricken plant climbed yesterday to 3,355 times the allowable limit, Japan' s nuclear safety agency said today.

S. Korea finds radioactivity in foods from Japan

Xinhuanet reports that S. Korea finds traces of radioactivity in foods from Japan.

S. Korea finds traces of radioactivity in foods from Japan
English.news.cn   2011-03-30 11:16:14

SEOUL, March 30 (Xinhua) --
Traces of radioactive material have been detected in food imported from Japan, the Korea Food and Drug Administration (KFDA) said Wednesday.

The KFDA said
minuscule amounts of cesium and iodine have been found in 14 different products from Japan, including melons, biscuits and breads.

It conducted radiation checks on a total of 244 food products from Japan between March 19 and 29.

FDA DOESN'T find radioactivity in foods from Japan

Sunstar reports that FDA clears Japan food from radiation.

FDA clears Japan food from radiation
http://www6.effectivemeasure.net/img.gifWednesday, March 30, 2011

THE Food and Drug Administration (FDA) said Tuesday that the food products imported from Japan remain clear from contamination.

In a statement read by Center for Device Regulation, Radiation Health and Research Director Agnette Peralta,
the FDA reported that their random sampling of food products from Japan have so far shown negative results.

Among the food products they have tested include chocolate milk, snack food, condiments, rice, teas, seaweed products, noodles and coffee.

Peralta, however, said that
none of the products tested came from the affected prefectures of Fukushima, Tochigi, Ibaraki, Gunma, Chiba, and Ehime. [WAIT A SECOND! The US IS allowing food imports from “the affected prefectures” (see article below). Isn' t this food being tested?]

FDA doesn't ban "safe" food from Fukushima

CNN reports that FDA doesn' t ban food from “safe” food from Fukushima.

Crisis threatens Japan's food industry
By the CNN Wire Staff
March 24, 2011 10:10 a.m. EDT

Tokyo (CNN)
-- … The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday issued
an import alert [not a ban] preventing milk, milk products, fresh vegetables and fruit from any of four prefectures -- Fukushima, Ibaraki, Tochigi and Gunma -- near the Fukushima nuclear reactors from entering the country. BUT SHIPMENTS OF SPINACH, MILK AND A LEAFY VEGETABLE CALLED KAKINA COULD "TEST OUT" AND ENTER THE U.S. FOOD SUPPLY if shown to be safe, an FDA spokeswoman said. [Remember the great job the FDA is doing testing gulf seafood.]

Other foods from those prefectures will be diverted for testing, she added.

Japanese food imports make up less than 4% of food imported into the United States, the FDA says.

"Let's say the contaminated spinach from Japan did make its way to the United States,"
posed CNN's Dr. Sanjay Gupta. "A person would have to eat the contaminated spinach from Japan every day for one year to get the same amount of radiation you would get from one CT (CAT) scan." [HIGHLY DECEPTIVE STATEMENT! You cannot compare EXTERNAL IRRADIATION and INTERNAL RADIATION.

Effects of radiation on the human body

Full Resolution


Comparisons with X-rays and CT scans “meaningless” — Inhaling particles increases radiation exposure by “a factor of a trillion” says expert
— A CAT scan (external radiation) does one time damage
— Eating contaminated spinach from Japan (internal radiation) will introduce radioactive particle into your body which will do damage everyday for the rest of the person' s life!

For more, see my entry on The Two Ways Radiation Kills

]



In Japan, that country's Health Ministry reported Tuesday finding
RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS AT LEVELS "DRASTICALLY EXCEEDING LEGAL LIMITS" IN 11 TYPES OF VEGETABLES GROWN IN FUKUSHIMA PREFECTURE, including broccoli and cabbage, according to Kyodo News Agency. [Wouldn't it be better to ban ALL food from the highly radioactive Japanese province, like other countries?]


radioactive caesium has also been detected in Japanese food, which can linger for years and cause long-term problems for food production and human health, according to the agencies.


Cox, an expert on the effects of radiation on the survivors of Nagasaki and Hiroshima, said he believes
the radiation levels measured in these products pose a "nonexistent" immediate risk to humans, and "very low" long-term risk.

Still, he concedes that
"radiation doses ingested through food is really very poorly understood." [SOME HONESTY!]


The immediate health risks for adults, by contrast, are minimal.

"I don't think you could eat enough spinach and you probably couldn't drink enough milk to have health risks," Cox added.

In the longer term,
"There is still a theoretical risk of development of cancer, 10, 20, 30 YEARS LATER," [TRANSLATION: a small dose of radiation in your food is perfectly safe… AS LONG AS YOU DON' T PLAN ON LIVING FOR MORE THAN 10 YEARS…] he said. …

Poison particles from nuke plant found in AT LEAST 12 U.S. states

The Daily Mail reports that poison particles from nuke plant found in AT LEAST 12 U.S. states.

Poison particles from nuke plant found in AT LEAST 12 U.S. states as Japan is put on 'maximum' radiation alert
By Richard Shears
Last updated at 8:06 AM on 30th March 2011

Traces of radioactive iodide from Fukushima leak now found in Alabama and Washington
Number of states to find radiation traces increasing every day

Radiation from the Fukushima leak has been detected in at least 12 U.S. states and is believed it will reach more in the coming days as Japan is put on 'maximum' alert.

The Environment Protection Agency confirmed that
radiation was found in air filters in Alabama and in rainwater in Pennsylvania and Massachusetts.

Though the trace levels are very low and not hazardous to health,
residents have been warned not to use rainwater which has been collected in cisterns.

Alert: Number of states affected by radiation is growing every day and the number now stands at 12 with more expected over the coming days
Alert: Number of states affected by radiation is growing every day and the number now stands at 12 with more expected over the coming days

My reaction: Fukushima radiation poisoning food in the sea (and land).

1) Record-high readings of contaminated sea water were found yesterday near the crippled Dai-Ichi nuclear plant,

2) Radioactive iodine in seawater rose to 3,355 times the regulated safety limit yesterday afternoon

3) Radioative cesium 137 poses long-term danger to the marine food chain.

4) Exports of Japanese seafood have been canceled by foreign buyers.

5) South Korea detects traces of radioactive material in food imported from Japan.

6) FDA hasn't detected radiation in food imported from Japan.

7) FDA hasn' t ban food from "safe" food from Fukushima, merely require testing (like gulf seafood).

8) Poison particles from nuke plant found in AT LEAST 12 U.S. states (but not in food from Japan).


Conclusion: Stay away from food from Japan unless you know where it comes from. I have little faith in FDA “testing”.

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